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Physics Questions Blog
Monday, 22 October 2007
Honors Physics Blog

Please answer the question below by responding to the blog, and then comment on at least 1 other student's answer.

1) When a cannon is fired, how does the size of the force of the cannon on the cannonball compare with the force of the cannonball on the cannon? How does the acceleration of the cannon compare with that of the cannonball? Defend your answer.


Posted by georgecelona at 3:39 PM EDT
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Monday, 22 October 2007 - 4:45 PM EDT

Name: "Danielle Gronlie"

When a cannonball is fired with a certain force the force on that of the cannon is equal and opposite to the force on the ball.  Also the same goes for the accerlations, they both are equal and opposite. This is all due to Newton's thrid law which states that every action has a reaction that is equal in magnitude and oppostie in direction.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 5:13 PM EDT

Name: "Meredith Withelder"

When a cannon fires a cannonball, the ball exerts an equal force on the cannon as the cannon exerted on the ball initially.  Because the cannon has more mass than the cannon ball does, the cannon does not travel as far as the cannonball.  The ball will accelerate much faster than the cannon because the cannon has friction with the ground and more inertia than the ball.  The accelerationg of the cannon will be in a negative direction compared to that of the ball because as Newton's third law states there must be an opposite direction reaction.   

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 5:18 PM EDT

Name: "Meredith Withelder"

I agree mostly with Danielle's comment except I'm not sure that I agree with her statement about acceleration.  I think the Cannon decelerates but not as much as the ball accelerates because the ball has less forces acting on it.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 5:28 PM EDT

Name: "Val Broussard"

When a cannon ball is fired the force of the cannon ball on the cannon is equal and opposite to the force of the cannon on the cannon ball. The cannon however will not travel as far as the ball does because it has more mass. Even though the force is the same on both objects the acceleration on the cannon ball is much more than that of the cannon itself. This because the intertia of the cannon is greater and the cannon has friction with the ground which is much more than the friction with the air that the cannonball had.  

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 5:31 PM EDT

Name: "Val Broussard"

I agree with Meredith on her statement. I think she is right about the acceleration. 

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 5:32 PM EDT

Name: "Steph Capoferri"

When the cannonball is fired, the force from the cannon onto the ball is equal and opposite due to Newton's Third law. The cannon does not however travel as far as the ball does due to its greater mass, which results in greater friction. The acceleration is much greater on the ball which has less mass and therefore the ball travels farther.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 5:39 PM EDT

Name: "Nicole Antonik"

The same force that is pushed out of the cannon is pushed onto the cannon. The force of the air resistance and gravity will slow down the cannonball.

 

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 5:42 PM EDT

Name: "Steph Capoferri"

 In response to Val I agree completely with what she said.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 8:17 PM EDT

Name: "Jonathan Madary"

When a cannonball is fired from a cannon, the force of the cannon on the cannonball will have the same magnitude as the force of the cannonball on the cannon due to Newton's third law which states that for every action, there is a reaction that is equal in magnitude. The acceleration of the cannon will be opposite that of the cannonball, also due to Newton's third law which states that for every action, there is a reaction that is opposite in direction. The cannon will have a negative acceleration, while the cannonball will have a positive acceleration.A

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 8:19 PM EDT

Name: "Jonathan Madary"

I agree with Meredith's explanation. She was very descriptive with the explanation of the acceleration of the cannon and the cannonball.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 8:47 PM EDT

Name: "Gina Ranalli"

When the ball is released from the cannon the force between the two is equal and opposite. Because of inertia the ball accelerates at a much faster rate. The cannon however has less inertia therefore it does not travel as far, or with an acceleration as great as the ball. The directions in which the ball and the cannon will go are equal and opposite so their ending places will result in opposite directions, because of Newton's third law.

 Meredith: I agree completely with Meredith. I agree with all acceleration, size, and force statements.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 8:48 PM EDT

Name: "Rob Vucelich"

When the cannon ball is fired an equal force is exerted on both the cannon and the ball. The cannon ball has less mass then the cannon and there for less inertia allowing it to accelerate faster. The cannon with a larger mass and friction from the ground doesnot travel nearly as far.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 8:51 PM EDT

Name: "Rob Vucelich"

I agree with meredith.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 8:53 PM EDT

Name: "Joe Duffy"

The force of the cannon on the ball is equal and opposite the force of the ball on the cannon. Despite this, because the cannon has much more mass than the ball, it does not accelerate nearly as fast as the ball does.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 8:54 PM EDT

Name: "Joe Duffy"

I agree with your statement about the forces and the accelerations.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 8:55 PM EDT

Name: "Joe Duffy"

Messed up on that last one. That comment was to Meredith's comment.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 9:15 PM EDT

Name: "Nicole McClain"

When a cannonball is fired from a cannon, the cannonball exerts the same magnitude of force against the cannon as the cannon does against the cannonball, as a result of Newton's third law of motion. However, because the cannonball has much less mass than the cannon and the cannon has much greater friction, the cannonball accelerates a great deal more than the cannon itself.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 9:18 PM EDT

Name: "Nicole McClain"

I agree completely with Meredith's answer to the question and I think her answer was thorough, complete, yet concise, and correct.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 9:36 PM EDT

Name: "Brittany Burns"

1) When the cannonball is fired the cannonball exerts an equal and opposite force on the cannon, as it states in Newton's 3rd Law that every action poses an equal and opposite reaction. The cannon, however, does not move as much as the ball since it has more mass than the cannonball does, therefore more inertia. The cannonball accelerates faster than the cannon because of the higher inertia.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 9:38 PM EDT

Name: "Brittany Burns"

I agree with Meredith in her introduction of friction also as a reason why the cannon would not accelerate as quickly as the cannonball.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 9:43 PM EDT

Name: "Greg Lieb"

The force of the cannon to the cannonball and the cannon ball on the cannon are equal and opposite to each other. The cannonball's acceleration was greater than the cannon because the cannon has a much larger mass making it have a much larger inertia which means it takes more force to move it compared with the cannonball. The cannon does accelerate some in the opposite direction as the cannonball when it recoils but its not nearly as great as the cannonball.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 9:45 PM EDT

Name: "Greg Lieb"

I agree with what Meredith said in her answer to the blog question, I said the same thing.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 10:04 PM EDT

Name: "Joe Noce"

When a cannonball is fired the force of the ball on the cannon and vice versa are equal and opposite. The forces are equal to eachother, and go in opposite directions. The acceleration of the ball is much greater than that of the cannon because the cannon has greater inertia. 

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 10:06 PM EDT

Name: "Joe Noce"

I agree with what Greg said, I liked his argument and the the way he worded it. 

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 10:46 PM EDT

Name: "Kevin Dougherty"

When a cannonball is fired from a cannon, the force of the ball on the cannon and the cannon on the ball are equal and opposite.  The ball travels much faster and farther than the cannon does because the cannon has a much greater mass and inertia.  For an instant, the accelerations will be the same, but since the mass, friction and inertia of the cannon are much greater than that of the ball, the cannon will deccelerate at a very high rate, as the ball will take a normal trajectory.

Monday, 22 October 2007 - 10:49 PM EDT

Name: "Kevin Dougherty"

I disagree with Danielle in the fact that the accelerates are not equal and opposite.  They are equal and opposite for an instant, but the acceleration of the cannon ball remains constant, as the cannon's does not.

Tuesday, 23 October 2007 - 7:18 PM EDT

Name: "Allison Davis "

Sorry I'm a day late; I forgot to do this yesterday.

When a cannon is fired, the force of the cannon on the cannonball is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force of the cannonball on the cannon. The acceleration of the cannon is less than the acceleration of the cannonball because the cannon has more mass, so more force is required to accelerate it.

Tuesday, 23 October 2007 - 7:29 PM EDT

Name: "Allison Davis "

I agree with Brittany's response, and I think she defended her answer well.

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